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Idea Blast January 2008


dbe Crazy Idea 1
Caption for picture

Gov. John Lynch said he expects half a million people to vote.

A wide open race in both parties and unseasonably mild temperatures could be contributing to the long lines at voting locations across the state.

"We've had unbelievable turnout for a primary," said I-Reporter Cynthia Gunn of Bow, New Hampshire. "It's a perfect voting day."

"Any other time we'd be having to shuttle a lot of people around, but people don't have a lot of excuses not to get out and vote today," said Gunn, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama.

New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan said high turnout at polling stations is forcing the New Hampshire secretary of state's office to send more ballots to some polling locations, including Hampton Falls, Portsmouth, Keene, Hudson and Pelham.

In particular, the polling places were running low on Democratic ballots, Scanlan said, but no polling station had run out.

dbe Crazy Idea 2

Gov. John Lynch said he expects half a million people to vote.

Caption for picture

A wide open race in both parties and unseasonably mild temperatures could be contributing to the long lines at voting locations across the state.

"We've had unbelievable turnout for a primary," said I-Reporter Cynthia Gunn of Bow, New Hampshire. "It's a perfect voting day."

"Any other time we'd be having to shuttle a lot of people around, but people don't have a lot of excuses not to get out and vote today," said Gunn, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama.

New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan said high turnout at polling stations is forcing the New Hampshire secretary of state's office to send more ballots to some polling locations, including Hampton Falls, Portsmouth, Keene, Hudson and Pelham.

In particular, the polling places were running low on Democratic ballots, Scanlan said, but no polling station had run out.

dbe Crazy Idea 3
Caption for picture

Gov. John Lynch said he expects half a million people to vote.

A wide open race in both parties and unseasonably mild temperatures could be contributing to the long lines at voting locations across the state.

"We've had unbelievable turnout for a primary," said I-Reporter Cynthia Gunn of Bow, New Hampshire. "It's a perfect voting day."

"Any other time we'd be having to shuttle a lot of people around, but people don't have a lot of excuses not to get out and vote today," said Gunn, a supporter of Sen. Barack Obama.

New Hampshire Deputy Secretary of State Dave Scanlan said high turnout at polling stations is forcing the New Hampshire secretary of state's office to send more ballots to some polling locations, including Hampton Falls, Portsmouth, Keene, Hudson and Pelham.

In particular, the polling places were running low on Democratic ballots, Scanlan said, but no polling station had run out.


News 1

For high-definition television manufacturers, the International Consumer Electronics Show is like the end of a stage of the Tour de France, when competitors pause to determine who’s leading. But only just for now — the race still has many miles to go before the winner’s decided.

Caption for picture

Depending on how you look at it, Matsushita Electric, the Japanese company that markets TVs in North America under the Panasonic brand, is the temporary leader at CES 2008, which began Monday. Its prototype 150-inch Life Screen plasma set dwarfs any other HDTV either planned or on the market.

Or looked at another way, Sony Corp., one of several hard-charging Asian competitors, is in front. Its XEL-1 debuted Monday as the first organic light-emitting diode set on the market in North America. Although it boasts only an 11-inch screen, it offers a precedent-obliterating contrast ratio of 1 million to 1 in a console only 3mm deep — roughly 30 times as sharp and one-tenth as thick as conventional LCD sets. It’s in Sony Style stores now, and the company unveiled a prototype 27-inch set, too.

The introductions demonstrate how little stability there is in the HDTV industry, which, while still in its relative infancy, is in a sustained growth spurt.

An alternative to LCD and plasma?
The 32- to 46-inch plasma and liquid-crystal displays that most viewers still find shiny and new are rapidly approaching commodity status as manufacturers race to get bigger, thinner, sharper and more stylish. Analysts said the OLED system had the potential to eclipse LCD and plasma as the leading flat-panel format.

News 2
Caption for picture

Depending on how you look at it, Matsushita Electric, the Japanese company that markets TVs in North America under the Panasonic brand, is the temporary leader at CES 2008, which began Monday. Its prototype 150-inch Life Screen plasma set dwarfs any other HDTV either planned or on the market.

Or looked at another way, Sony Corp., one of several hard-charging Asian competitors, is in front. Its XEL-1 debuted Monday as the first organic light-emitting diode set on the market in North America. Although it boasts only an 11-inch screen, it offers a precedent-obliterating contrast ratio of 1 million to 1 in a console only 3mm deep — roughly 30 times as sharp and one-tenth as thick as conventional LCD sets. It’s in Sony Style stores now, and the company unveiled a prototype 27-inch set, too.

The introductions demonstrate how little stability there is in the HDTV industry, which, while still in its relative infancy, is in a sustained growth spurt.

News 3

For high-definition television manufacturers, the International Consumer Electronics Show is like the end of a stage of the Tour de France, when competitors pause to determine who’s leading. But only just for now — the race still has many miles to go before the winner’s decided.

Caption for picture

Depending on how you look at it, Matsushita Electric, the Japanese company that markets TVs in North America under the Panasonic brand, is the temporary leader at CES 2008, which began Monday. Its prototype 150-inch Life Screen plasma set dwarfs any other HDTV either planned or on the market.

Or looked at another way, Sony Corp., one of several hard-charging Asian competitors, is in front. Its XEL-1 debuted Monday as the first organic light-emitting diode set on the market in North America. Although it boasts only an 11-inch screen, it offers a precedent-obliterating contrast ratio of 1 million to 1 in a console only 3mm deep — roughly 30 times as sharp and one-tenth as thick as conventional LCD sets. It’s in Sony Style stores now, and the company unveiled a prototype 27-inch set, too.

The introductions demonstrate how little stability there is in the HDTV industry, which, while still in its relative infancy, is in a sustained growth spurt.


Brainstorming Technique

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.

Chemistry Tip

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.

Upcoming Brainstorms

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.

 


New Business Lead 1

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.

New Business Lead 2

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.

New Business Lead 1

Edgy indie fare dominated feature-film nominations for the DGA Award, with Paramount Vantage and Miramax each figuring in three of the noms.

Caption for picture

Nominees announced Tuesday include Paul Thomas Anderson and the directing team of Joel and Ethan Coen, respectively, for "There Will Be Blood" and "No Country for Old Men," both co-productions of Paramount Vantage and Miramax; Julian Schnabel for "The Diving Bell and the Butterfly," from Miramax; Sean Penn for "Into the Wild," from Par Vantage; and Tony Gilroy for "Michael Clayton," from Warner Bros.

All are first-time nominees, except Joel Coen, who was nominated for 1996's "Fargo." On some past films, Joel Coen has been credited as director and Ethan Coen as producer, but the siblings share the directing credit on "No Country."

The Coens have been recognized as a directing team by the DGA since 2004's "Ladykillers." Their "No Country" nom represents just the fifth time a directing team has been nominated by the guild, which did so last year with Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris for "Little Miss Sunshine."

This year's winner will be named at the 60th annual DGA Awards gala, set for Jan. 26 at the Hyatt Century Plaza in Century City.

"What makes this award truly meaningful to directors is the knowledge that only this one is decided by their peers -- the men and women who know firsthand the passion, sweat and fear that goes into each production," DGA president Michael Apted said.



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